Our Blog

The Origins of Valentine's Day

February 13th, 2019

When we think of Valentine’s Day, we think of cards, flowers, and chocolates. We think of girlfriends celebrating being single together and couples celebrating their relationship. We think of all things pink and red taking over every pharmacy and grocery store imaginable. But what Dr. Dennis Johnson and our team would like to think of is when and how this joyous, love-filled day began.

Several martyrs’ stories are associated with the origins of Valentine’s Day. One of the most widely known suggests that Valentine was a Roman priest who went against the law at a time when marriage had been banned for young men. He continued to perform marriage ceremonies for young lovers in secret and when he was discovered, he was sentenced to death.

Another tale claims that Valentine was killed for helping Christians escape from Roman prisons. Yet another says that Valentine himself sent the first valentine when he fell in love with a girl and sent her a letter and signed it, “From your Valentine.”

Other claims suggest that it all began when Geoffrey Chaucer, an Englishman often referred to as the father of English literature, wrote a poem that was the first to connect St. Valentine to romance. From there, it evolved into a day when lovers would express their feelings for each other. Cue the flowers, sweets, and cards!

Regardless of where the holiday came from, these stories all have one thing in common: They celebrate the love we are capable of as human beings. And though that’s largely in a romantic spirit these days, it doesn’t have to be. You could celebrate love for a sister, a friend, a parent, even a pet.

We hope all our patients know how much we love them! Wishing you all a very happy Valentine’s Day from the team at Johnson Orthodontics!

Are lingual braces for you?

February 6th, 2019

Lingual braces are one of the most subtle ways to transform your smile. Because the brackets and wires are attached to the inside of your teeth, there is almost no visible sign that you are wearing braces. If this is an important consideration for you for personal or professional reasons, this advantage might make lingual braces your best choice for orthodontic treatment.

Every method of straightening teeth also presents potential disadvantages to consider. In the case of lingual braces, patients should be aware of some issues both similar to and different from those posed by regular braces.

  • Tongue Sensitivity

Just as your lip and cheek areas need to get used to typical front-facing braces, your tongue might be sensitive at first to lingual braces. The same orthodontic wax that protects your lips and mouth from irritation caused by metal brackets and wires on the front of teeth can also be used to reduce the tongue irritation caused by brackets behind your teeth.

  • Speech Difficulties

Since your tongue will not be hitting the backs of your teeth in the usual way, you might find some initial difficulty pronouncing words properly. This problem usually disappears over time. Practicing speaking aloud will help your tongue adjust to your new braces. Talk to us if this is a special concern for you.

  • Eating/Cleaning Teeth

Just as with regular braces, you will need to avoid any foods that can damage your orthodontic work. All the usual culprits, such as caramel, hard candy, and popcorn, should be avoided with any type of braces. But because lingual braces are inside the teeth, they can be trickier to clean. Careful brushing and flossing are still vital, and we have suggestions for making sure your lingual braces are free from food particles and plaque.

  • Time

Lingual braces can require a slightly longer treatment schedule. We can let you know the approximate treatment times for whatever orthodontic plans you are considering.

  • Cost

Because lingual braces are customized to fit you, they can be somewhat pricier than other options.

We have the special training and skill needed to provide you with lingual braces if that is the option that you choose. We also have suggestions for adjusting to your lingual braces comfortably and making them work for you. Talk to Dr. Dennis Johnson at our Columbus, OH office about all the possibilities for straightening your teeth, including any potential concerns or advantages each treatment method presents. If you would prefer that your braces be almost unnoticeable, that advantage might be the deciding factor in making lingual braces the ideal choice for you.

Not-So-Sweet Sweets

January 30th, 2019

Birthdays. Valentine’s Day. Halloween. A trip to the movies. There are just some occasions where a sweet treat is on the menu. Now that you are getting braces, does that mean you have to give up desserts completely? Not at all! The trick to finding the right treat is to know which foods are safe for your braces and which should wait until your treatment is complete.

There are some foods which should always be avoided. They fall into three main categories:

  • Hard and Crunchy

Hard candies, peanut brittle, popcorn balls, nutty candy bars—anything that is hard to bite into is hard on your braces, and can damage brackets or even break them.

  • Chewy

Caramels, taffy, chewy squares and rolls, licorice and other super-chewy candies can break brackets and bend wires. Not to mention, they are really difficult to clean from the surface of teeth and braces.

  • Sticky

Soft foods are generally fine, but soft and sticky candies are another thing entirely. Gumdrops, jelly beans, most gum and other sticky treats stick to your braces, making it hard to clean all that sugar from around your brackets. And even soft sticky candies can bend wires or damage your brackets.

As you have probably noticed, almost all candy falls into one of these categories. Of course, while sugary treats shouldn’t be a major part of anyone’s diet, and careful brushing and flossing are always on the menu if you do indulge, wearing braces does not mean giving up on treats entirely. A better alternative when you are craving something sweet is to choose something that avoids crunchy, chewy and sticky hazards, such as soft puddings, cupcakes or cookies. There are even some candy brands that are safe for your braces.

Talk to Dr. Dennis Johnson the next time you visit our Columbus, OH office about the dos and don’ts of desserts—we have tasty suggestions that will make those special occasions both sweet for you and safe for your orthodontic work!

Will my child benefit from early orthodontic treatment?

January 23rd, 2019

According to the American Association of Orthodontists, orthodontic treatment for children should start at around age seven. Dr. Dennis Johnson can evaluate your child’s orthodontic needs early on to see if orthodontic treatment is recommended for your son or daughter.

Below, we answer common questions parents may have about the benefits of early childhood orthodontics.

What does early orthodontic treatment mean?

Early orthodontic treatment usually begins when a child is eight or nine years old. Typically known as Phase One, the goal here is to correct bite problems such as an underbite, as well as guide the jaw’s growth pattern. This phase also helps make room in the mouth for teeth to grow properly, with the aim of preventing teeth crowding and extractions later on.

Does your child need early orthodontic treatment?

The characteristics and behavior below can help determine whether your little one needs early treatment.

  • Early loss of baby teeth (before age five)
  • Late loss of baby teeth (after age five or six)
  • The child’s teeth do not meet properly or at all
  • The child is a mouth breather
  • Front teeth are crowded (you won’t see this until the child is about seven or eight)
  • Protruding teeth, typically in the front
  • Biting or chewing difficulties
  • A speech impediment
  • The jaw shifts when the child opens or closes the mouth
  • The child is older than five years and still sucks a thumb

What are the benefits of seeking orthodontic treatment early?

Jaw bones do not harden until children reach their late teens. Because children’s bones are still pliable, corrective procedures such as braces are easier and often faster than they would be for adults.

Early treatment at our Columbus, OH office can enable your child to avoid lengthy procedures, extraction, and surgery in adulthood. Talk with Dr. Dennis Johnson today to see if your child should receive early orthodontic treatment.